Electric Water Pumps

CVH and Zetec tuning, suspension and braking mods.

Electric Water Pumps

Postby StreetDragster on Mon Aug 15, 2005 9:08 am

Anyone any experiances good or bad with these?

I'm looking at the Davies Craig ones that go in your bottom radiator hose, use the electronic controller and you need to remove the water pump impeller and thermostat.
They have an 80litres/hr one and a 110litre/hr one due out soon

Zetec engine BTW with only a tiny alloy radiator (In a kit car)

Thanks

Matt
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Postby sailorbob on Mon Aug 15, 2005 9:52 am

Not fitted mine yet (the 80l one), but it got the thumbs up from Dave Walker when he was writing for CCC. I'm going to plumb in a Kenlowe preheater too and use the electric pump to circulate the coolant whilst it warms up. You can also fit a timer relay so it runs for say 5-10 mins after ignition off to cool the turbo. I think the electronic contoller might be not worth it though, I dislike the idea of not flowing much coolant until it starts to get warm, the assumption is you don't get hot spots and pockets of steam.
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Postby DaveZetec on Mon Aug 15, 2005 9:57 am

A mate of mine runs one of these on his triumph GT6 - He has had no problems with it.

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Postby StreetDragster on Mon Aug 15, 2005 10:05 am

Cheers guys, the Westfield posse appear to have given it the thumbs up too but they fit a resistor in parallel with the temp sender to reduce the sensors ranges making it hold the engine coolant at 80 degrees, sounds like a good idea.

Sailorbob- Understand what your saying about the controller, but if the thermostat is removed as it recommends wont you get over-cooling then?

Thanks

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Postby sailorbob on Mon Aug 15, 2005 10:06 am

Just remember when fitting it that it needs to be mounted low down as it needs to be gravity fed and cannot lift the coolant when fitted high up.
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Postby StreetDragster on Mon Aug 15, 2005 10:28 am

Cool, cheers, it'll be in the bottom radiator hose as low as i can get it!

Thanks

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Postby heeman10 on Mon Aug 15, 2005 10:57 am

Trying to break 230bhp now then are you? Didn't take you long :lol: It would be very handy to have a switchable resistor so you could have a slow cycle when warming up, then switch to the faster cycle once it's hot. Not sure you're up to wiring something like that in? Don't think I am :lol:

A controller would, as you say, give you a faster warm-up, and if (I'm assuming you'd like to) you do some track days, you may find your road setting just isn't enough. Some circuits (eg Three Sisters, which I used my dad's Caterham for one hot summer's day) see you use second gear almost all the way down, with about 5 seconds' relief in third gear. It quickly sees temps want to come up, so if your water pump was set up to be just quick enough on the road, it's quite likely it could spoil your fun on the track. No thermostat, so the only way to raise/lower your temps would be masking of the radiator, which is entirely doable.
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Postby StreetDragster on Mon Aug 15, 2005 11:09 am

heeman10 wrote:Trying to break 230bhp now then are you? Didn't take you long :lol:


Nope, just trying to keep the engine temps under control, there a little on the high side :)

It would be very handy to have a switchable resistor so you could have a slow cycle when warming up, then switch to the faster cycle once it's hot. Not sure you're up to wiring something like that in? Don't think I am :lol:


Its not a switchable one, the controller is set to be adjustable between 85-105 degrees running temperature, fitting the parallel resistor lowers that range to 70-95 degrees, good for westfields/dax's. Easy to put a resistor in :D

A controller would, as you say, give you a faster warm-up, and if (I'm assuming you'd like to) you do some track days, you may find your road setting just isn't enough. Some circuits (eg Three Sisters, which I used my dad's Caterham for one hot summer's day) see you use second gear almost all the way down, with about 5 seconds' relief in third gear. It quickly sees temps want to come up, so if your water pump was set up to be just quick enough on the road, it's quite likely it could spoil your fun on the track. No thermostat, so the only way to raise/lower your temps would be masking of the radiator, which is entirely doable.


The controller is more of an regulator, you set the controller to, for example 75 degrees. It then doesnt engage the pump on warm up until the coolant hits 75 degrees, and then increases the pump speed as required to maintain that temperature, regardless of engine speed which is the major advantage. So no thermostat is needed as the controller deals with it via water flow rate. Getme?

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Postby sailorbob on Mon Aug 15, 2005 11:13 am

StreetDragster wrote:Understand what your saying about the controller, but if the thermostat is removed as it recommends wont you get over-cooling then?
I'm planning on leaving the thermostat in.
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Postby heeman10 on Mon Aug 15, 2005 12:16 pm

Ah ok, I thought the controller varied flowrate, not temperature. Scrap all of the above then! Yergetme :lol:
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Postby StreetDragster on Tue Aug 16, 2005 8:06 am

Seems like the general consensus on the Lotus 7/Westfield forums is to run the pump at full speed all the time, not use the controller and keep the thermostat in.

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Re: Electric Water Pumps

Postby spam84 on Sun Jun 19, 2016 3:40 pm

I was looking into this and you can use the fan switch to activate the pump (via a relay). Keep the stat to allow the engine to warm up like normal and use the pump to assist the existing mechanical water pump when the engine needs cooling.

If you wire a permanent 12V to the switch and fan circuit, the fan and pump can remain on even after the ignition has been switched off which will prevent the residual heat from the exhaust and turbo raising the temperatures to dangerous levels.

That's the plan anyway :)
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